Monday, September 30, 2013

Dr. Phoebe Rich offers tips to keep your nails looking healthy



Recently while changing up nail polish, The Makeup Examiner noticed that her nails were not looking to lovely. Although, nails are often one of the first things that people notice about you, TME’s concern was less of a vanity issue and far more one of overall health. So she turned to board-certified dermatologist, Dr. Phoebe Rich for answers.

Dr. Rich is also a clinical adjunct professor of dermatology at Oregon Health Science University and created a “healthy nail care” video in collaboration with the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). The first bit of advice from Dr. Rich, “Always keep your nails clean and dry”. She went on to share, “Never bite your nails or remove the cuticle. Not only do these actions damage the nail, they also increase the risk of infection.” The advice that she offered was amazingly full-spectrum and included our often-neglected toenails.

What beautynista doesn’t love to have pretty and healthy nails? And in fact, healthy nails are the first step to pretty nails. Here’s the lowdown on easy nail care:

  • For fingernails, keep them shaped and free of snags by filing with an emery board.
  • When filing your fingernails, go in one direction straight across the top and then slightly round the slide. By filing in one direction, versus back and forth like a saw, you keep the nail fibers down and lessen the likelihood of hangnails.
  • Do not use your fingernails as a tool, such as opening pop-top cans or removing staples from papers.
  • For toenails, trim them regularly and keep them shorts as to avoid trauma or injury.
  • If your toenails are difficult to cut, soak your feet in warm salt water for 5 minutes before you trim them.
  • Never “dig out” ingrown toenails, see a dermatologist for treatment.
  • Wear shoes that fit properly to avoid “squishing” your toes.
  • The best way to avoid catching a nail fungus, (or other fungi), at a publish pool or the shower at the gym is to always wear water-shoes such as flip-flops.
 One thing that Dr. Rich emphasis, “If you notice changes in the look of your nails, experience swelling, or have pain, see a board-certified dermatologist.” Changes, such as the ones that Dr. Rich mentions, can be an indicator of other health issues such as diabetes or poor circulation, which can affect your overall health.


No comments:

Post a Comment